Grow a Vegetable Garden This Year

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As I have now pretty much finished updating this site to make the transition to the 2nd decade of the 21st century, I know have more time for what I really love, writing, gardening, and taking photographs. One of the themed series I want to do in 2010 is one that will help you get motivated to start your own vegetable garden. As a first in this endeavor I can’t think of a better summary than to watch this video from several months ago. Michelle Obama really hits the nail on its proverbial head with her comments in this video. Think about it. Especially if you have a family with children, one of the most valuable things they can learn is to recognize what real food is.

Enjoy the video and take note of the part where the White House chef talks about getting seeds from Monticello, (around 3:15). This is exactly the opposite of the thinking of Monsanto and other huge corporations that want to completely control what seeds can be used in farming. I hope President Obama sees the irony of what his wife and chef think is important when compared to what the current policies of our government are encouraging. It is overdue to reign in these multi-national agribusinesses that want to corner the market on what we can eat and grow.

This year, join us in the fight to reclaim ownership of the food we eat by growing some of  it yourself.

Related Posts:
Memo to White House – Please Compost
For the First Time Since the Early 1940’s, The White House Has a Garden!

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Will Sig
1 Nicholson

I want to turn a childs sandbox into a vegetable garden.It is made of wood. It’s about 3 by 3 in size. And about a foot deep. How deep should the dirt be for best results? Oh and since i will be adding new dirt is there anything I should add to it?

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2 Nicholson

I want to turn a childs sandbox into a vegetable garden.It is made of wood. It’s about 3 by 3 in size. And about a foot deep. How deep should the dirt be for best results? Oh and since i will be adding new dirt is there anything I should add to it?

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3 Atlanta Civil Engineers

Good advice. I live in a condo in city center so it’s a bit tough but where there’s a will, there’s a way!

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4 Will

A foot in depth is plenty. Just make sure the wood is not treated with preservative.

And to anyone who lives in a place that has no space, there are two other options. First is containers. Many vegetables do well in containers, especially if they are trained to grow vertically. The other is to look for a local community garden, or as they call them in Europe where they are everywhere, an “allotment”.

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5 John

Hey Will, it worked! We actually got three tiny yet ripe tomatoes by pulling & hanging them before the freeze. The scallions were in a container so we brought them in, and they’re still thriving on just a bit of window light. So even starting late in the year before an early winter, we managed to get some food out of the yard.

Now this year, hopefully we can get a handle on all the air potato vines and plant some veggies early in spring. A spot is already cleared in the yard and we’ve got a few seeds sprouting inside… Maybe we actually learned something from all the failures of the last season 🙂
.-= John´s last blog ..A good time to pull the weeds =-.

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6 Will

Ha! That is funny John! I just published a post on this today and then now saw your comment. That is a great idea to do the scallions that way. I planted onions and scallions in the garden in the fall and they will overwinter and take off now that the days are getting longer. But putting some in a container and having them over the winter sounds great.

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