WordPress Plugins

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I think I will post this article to not only link to things I have written about plugins I use, but to also provide a place to discuss getting them working as intended. There are a couple people commenting here that have more technical knowledge than me on these things and this will enable everyone to see their comments and links to their own sites that might have helpful info on configuration etc.

Here is an article I wrote on Numly Numbers:

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Will Sig
1 Will

I will have to look for yet another plugin because I have seen WP sites that allow users to edit their posts for a period of time after publishing. I think that would be helpful for typos, brain freezes, and other things that I, for one, am prone to!

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2 Will

Here is one I just found. It looks like it is a bit complicated to install, though. I think I will ask a couple of friendly bloggers I know what they use to allow users to edit their comments.

http://sw-guide.de/wordpress/plugins/edit-comments-xt/

-Will

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3 JD Thomas

I’ve never one that does that but if you find one, let me know and I’ll probably install it too.

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4 JD Thomas

I’ll give it a try and let you know how it goes.

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5 Will

Thank you very much. You are probably better to take a first try at than me! It does look like a good plugin once completely installed.

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6 Will

OK, too bad. When I find out what some of the people I know are using, I’ll let you know.

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7 JD Thomas

I tried and abandoned it. My theme is so complex that the instructions he gives didn’t really match up. I got it working – kinda – but only for people registered and logged on. It broke the ability for non-registered and logged in people to comment at all so I removed it.

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8 JD Thomas

I’m sure it works wonderfully for people using the default WP theme or one based on the default theme.

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9 Will

I found a couple more. The first one, Ajax seems to do a lot more than just allow editing of comments, but I saw a site that uses it successfully for that. The second seems more targeted?

http://www.mikesmullin.com/2006/06/05/ajax-comments-20/

http://e5media.com/2007/04/02/edit-comments-plugin-for-wordpress/

-Will

@Techfun – Do you have a contact link on your site? I was going to email you to let you know I moved the above comments to this new post, but I did not see any contact info on your site. Maybe I am blind this morning? 😉 Anyway, I’m sure you will find your way here! You can always use my contact page plugin to email me directly.

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10 JD Thomas

The Ajax one is cute but doesn’t solve the editing problem.

The other one is one I THINK I tried before. Not sure. I’ll look at it.

You can use the email address I used in the comment to reach me. I’ll mail you at your contact address as well to make sure you have it.

I should add a comment/contact form to my blog, just haven’t yet.

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11 Will

The second one is very similar to one that I found before, but it is a separate web site and author.

I tried the Ajax one again on the author’s site. It did allow me to edit my comment, but it is a bit confusing to do it. ** (On edit: I see now it did not actually allow me to edit my comment, it posted a second comment with the edits!) Not what is wanted. Also there are some issues with commenting there that make me wonder… If the author of the plugin can’t get their own comment form to work flawlessly, then how will we?

I have a couple of emails out to other people that have comment editing on their site and will post here when I find out what they use.

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12 Will
13 Anna

Hi Will, since you another person that using wordpress, I have a questions: are you on the wordpress blog only or the wordpress website builder, meaning do you know php programming? I am considering trying out! Anna 🙂

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14 Will

I use WordPress on my own site, rather than on WordPress.com. I like the flexibility that you don’t have on WP.com, although it is easier on WP.com.

I did not know anything about php when I started. Now I can do a bit, or at least enough to customize my site to the point where I can get totally confused! Just kidding! But the thing is if you are like me, having a lot of customization options available to you can be a mixed blessing. Also if you do a lot of customizations, it can be daunting to think about moving to a new theme. I have been thinking about using a whiter, cleaner theme for a while now, but can’t seem to find the time needed to change to it. This is because I know there will be a lot of work getting things just the way I want them.

By the above, I don’t mean the plugins. I use a whole long list of them and in theory they should just go right over to any new theme.

If you have any specific questions, feel free to ask. JD of Techfun also uses the stand alone WordPress and is probably more technically advanced at it than I am and may offer his suggestions on what you are considering.

-Will

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15 Will

JD – Except for a few CSS style sheet changes, Most of my customizations are actually in my php files. Maybe this is because of my particular theme? I don’t think I have a single php file without some changes to it, some very extensive. But I just learned as I went and did not find it too difficult.

Anna – In an ideal world with a theme that you really like, I guess the only thing needed would be a few CSS changes for your own look and then plugins. I don’t know exactly why I found it necessary to edit all my php files. Maybe I am just too particular! I really should learn more CSS, though, it really opens up more options.

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16 Anna

Will, JD thanks for your encouragement. I been wanting to learn php for while now, but just no time, but then I know it is matter of time someone will come out with easy to use platform and wordpress may be it. With your explanation, I think I will put wordpress this on my task list and start working on it soon. The thing is that about 7 years ago I learn html and been working with frontpage (yeah, frontpage). I have two clients, and I would like to give them something that is low on maintenance on my side because I am not web designer and it is not cost effective for me the amount of work I have to do. And I think that wordpress with blog capability will give them better exposure, and spend less money in the long term. I am getting excited now…Anna 🙂 PS I am usually okay figuring out technical issues, but sometimes I need straight forward answers like yours to get me going.

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17 JD Thomas

Anna, the best part about Wordpress is that you don’t need to know any PHP.

Wordpress is quite proud of its Famous 5-Minute Install. And to be honest, after you’ve done it once, it could be called a 1-Minute install.

Between themes with customization options built in, plugins, and widgets you can put together a very nice Wordpress site with just a bit of CSS knowledge and basic HTML.

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18 JD Thomas

Will, mine too, and yea you can make much more dramatic changes via the PHP itself.

I was just explaining that Anna should not let a lack of PHP knowledge be a factor in deciding whether or not to give WP a try. 🙂

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19 Anna

JD thanks that is very useful information. Just want to make it clear how it works. I have domain names, and I have host, and wordpress or joomla is plugin that is installed and helps you build websites with little programming knowledge. Correct me if I am wrong. Anna 🙂

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20 JD Thomas

Anna, You can use Wordpress as a complete CMS (Content Management System) to drive a website without ever using the blog functions at all.

I did this site, http://www.mypuppymaid.com a long time ago for the guy who cleans my yard. It’s not my taste, but he and his other customers seem to like it. I picked Wordpress for him because the WYSIWYG editor plugin lets him treat his pages like he would a Word document, and because its all on the server, I can bail him out if he breaks something from anywhere.

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21 JD Thomas

BUT, if you want to play with a very powerful CMS that would allow you to roll out impressive, low maintenance sites for your customers you should check out Joomla.

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22 Anna

…JD thanks a lot for all your tips…I know where to find you if I have questions, I checked out your blog, cool stuff. I found some dogman photo by accident, lol on the blog from your blogroll.

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23 Anna

…and Will thanks for starting this topic so I am more confident now in exploring other possibilities…anna 🙂 thanks again.

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24 JD Thomas

Yea, for all these things you need a host that supports PHP and MySQL. And preferably a web server running Apache on Linux or Unix. (There are workarounds for some of these things but I avoid those.)

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25 Will

Justin, yes the Hittail problem was fixed by clearing out all my cookies. It seems that over time, something starts to hang with Hittail and this is somehow fixed by getting rid of all my cookies. I have had to do it again since the original problem.

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26 Justin G
27 Justin G

Regarding the loading issue, I used the plugin tailhitter on a wordpress blog, and it didn’t put the hittail code inside any div tags. Yet yours is!????!???

It’s always recommended to be the absolute last thing before the closing body tag. Even if you have to directly modify your theme’s footer.php.

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28 Will

I don’t know why clearing the cookies fixes it. I don’t really know that much about the hittail service. I tried it along with a plugin that is supposed to insert the hittail code into every post. I don’t remember if it really worked or not as it has been a while since then. I see that I have long since deactivated the plugin, so I guess that was not working. I do still have the code in my footer php file, though, and seem to remember that I manually put that there. I don’t think the plugin did that.

Justin if you could refresh me on how the hittail service is supposed to work, I may remember exactly what I decided on it.

I know I have never seen any reports or search or keyword suggestions, so I don’t think I ever really had it working correctly. I probably should take the code out of my footer.

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29 Will

Here is a link to an edit comments plugin that is in use on another site I frequent. It seems to work real well. Thanks to Jonathan Baily of Plagiarism Today. I will try to make time in the schedule to test it out this week.

http://www.raproject.com/wordpress/wp-ajax-edit-comments/

-Will

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30 JD Thomas

Will: I just installed it and it worked beautifully with my theme and Wordpress 2.3.

Check it out if you like. You should be able to edit your comment for 10 minutes.

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31 Will

Wow, JD! You are right on this. Thank you very much for checking it out.

I just did an edit on one of my comments on your site and it works great. Only thing that is strange is that the instruction says click on you name or the comment to edit. If I click on the comment, I get the edit text box. If I click on my name, I get something else, prompting me to save author information. If that is another plugin that you use, the fix might just be to edit the label text in the edit comment plugin’s file to say “click on the comment” and leave out the or name part.

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32 JD Thomas

I think its so you can fix a typo’d email address or name. It works for me but I’m logged in. I’ll try it after logging out.

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33 JD Thomas

Yep! Clicking on your name lets you edit your name or blog URL. If other people mention confusion I’ll edit the instructions.

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34 Will

I finally installed it here, also. Let me know if it is not working as expected to allow you to edit your comments for 15 minutes after posting. I may change the time limit to longer after I think about whether there are any reasons not to?

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35 JD Thomas

Test of new Plugins for will.

Test edit: Seems to work well!

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